Aboutpv – Halloween Fun in the Area!

Aboutpv – Halloween Fun in the Area!

Palos Verdes residents know that Halloween is just around the corner, as you drive through our local neighborhoods and see the homes decked out. This fun fall holiday has been a great treat for kids throughout the years, with their school parades and carnivals, to the local pumpkin patches and fairs.

This year the Peninsula Center be having a Fall Carnival and Halloween Spooktacular Fair starting on Friday night, October 27, thru Sunday, October 29, 2017. Friday night is a “Teen Night” from 5:00 to 10:00 p.m., with a portion of pre-sale tickets going to our local schools.  Teen Night will be featuring unlimited ride wristbands for local and high school students along with performances from youth bands and are purchased through the schools or www.palosverdeschamber.com. On Saturday, the center will be offering trick or treating from 11:30 – 2:00 p.m, while the carnival going on. The carnival hours on Saturday, October 28, are 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and on Sunday, October 29, 2017, from 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. The Palos Verdes Fall Carnival and Halloween Spooktacular is located on Crossfield Road between Silver Spur Road and Indian Peak Road in Rolling Hills Estates.

The South Coast Botanic Garden will be celebrating their Great Pumpkin Hunt from October 1 through November 30, 2017 at the garden. Participants will be searching for the missing pumpkin patch (as last years prized pumpkin was eaten by a sneaky squirrel and a ravenous rabbit). The birds of the garden (ravens, owls, hummingbirds and hawks) have teamed up to save this year’s patch. This is all included with the daily admission charges. The South Coast Botanic Garden is located at 26400 Crenshaw Blvd., Palos Verdes Peninsula.

Lunada Bay’s Homeowners Association will be celebrating their Harvest Festival on Sunday, October 22, 2017, from 2:00 – 6:00 p.m. At the festival families can enjoy pumpkin & face painting, bungee jumping, arts and crafts, kiddie carnival, balloon crafting, rock climbing wall and more. The Harvest Festival is located on the corner of Yarmouth & Via Anacapa.

Photo courtesy of the Lunada Bay Homeowners Association.

Always remember if you have any questions regarding real estate please feel free to contact me.

 

 

White Point Preserve & Education Center

White Point Preserve & Education Center

White Point Education Center

Palos Verdes residents are lucky to have the White Point Nature Preserve sharing the Peninsula with them. The preserve features 102 acres of restored coastal sage scrub habitat, hiking and accessible trails overlooking the ocean and Catalina Island. It also has become the home of the Nature Education Center which opened in 2010, and acts as a resource for students, families and different community groups from all over Los Angeles.

Located in San Pedro, it is owned by the City of Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks. This helps to maintain the property which sat empty behind fences for almost 20 years. A management agreement was signed over to the Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy in 2001, which allowed it to restore the site with the help of numerous volunteers and hours of planting native scrub and grasses, all while installing public trails.

The Nature Education Center is housed in a repurposed historic Cold War assembly building. The Center was made possible with the support of the California Department of Parks and Recreation, the California Coastal Conservancy, and the Ibrahim El-Hefni Technical Training Foundation. A generous grant from Alcoa Foundation funded the creation of the interpretative exhibits and support from Major Family Foundation enabled the creation of four adjacent native plant demonstration gardens.

The White Point Landslide which occured on November 2011, moved about 420 feet of earth and roadway of Paseo del Mar, causing a portion of the White Point Nature Preserve to actually be moved about 53 feet toward the ocean. The Conservancy is dedicated to safeguarding the Preserve from a road traversing through the natural lands. To learn more about the Preserve go to: http://pvplc.org.

White Point Nature Preserve is located at 1600 W. Paseo del Mar, San Pedro, CA 90731, and is open daily from dawn to dusk along with the parking area. The Education Center is open from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.on Wednesday, Saturday & Sunday.

The parking area is open daily from dawn until dusk. Parking is available in the lot accessed from the west end Paseo del Mar from sun up to sun down during Preserve hours.  Please note that due to the landslide, access to White Point Nature Preserve is via Western Avenue.

 Photo courtesy of the White Point Nature Preserve & Education Center.

 

Palos Verdes Peninsula’s Point Fermin Lighthouse

Palos Verdes Peninsula’s Point Fermin Lighthouse

Point Fermin Lighthouse was the first navigational light into the San Pedro Bay and was built in 1874. Phineas Banning along with local support had petitioned the Government and the US lighthouse Board to place a lighthouse on the point in 1854, but because of funding and land disputes the construction did not start until 1874.

Paul J. Pelz was a draftsman for the US Lighthouse Board, and he designed the Stick Style Victorian lighthouse which is characterized by its Victorian architectural style with gabled roofs, horizontal siding, decorative cross beams and hand carved porch railings. That same design was used for six other lighthouses between 1873 and 1874.

Lighthouse Keepers were a staff of federal employees whose job was to keep the light lit as a beacon for ships, maintain the lighthouse lens, and the general up-keep of the building. Point Fermin’s first lighthouse keepers were women. Mary and Ella Smith came from a lighthouse family and their brother Victor, a Washington Territory customs officer.

Captain George Shaw took over as the lighthouse keeper position shortly after the Smith sister’s resigned in 1882. Shaw was a retired sea captain but he refused to retire far from his beloved sea and was delighted by the opportunity to serve as the keeper at Point Fermin. He was the first keeper at Point Fermin to wear the US Lighthouse Service uniform, which was required of all employees in 1884.

The last keepers of the Point Fermin Light were the Austin family which moved into the lighthouse in 1917. William Austin had served as keeper at two other California lighthouses, Point Arena and Point Conception, before coming to Point Fermin.This was the first time the lighthouse had children occupying it, and later two of the eight children actually took over after their parents death until 1927, when management of the light was turned over to the City of Los Angeles until 1941.On December 7th, 1941, Pearl Harbor was bombed and the coast was blacked out for fear of being a beacon to enemy ships and planes. Sadly, the light was never to be lit again. I

In 1972, two devoted citizens, Bill Olesen and John Olguin, raised funds and worked diligently to replace the lantern room and the lighthouse to its original glory for her 100th birthday in 1974. Their efforts also placed the lighthouse on the National Register of Historic Places. In 2002, the lighthouse was restored, retrofitted, and rehabilitated for public access with funds from the City of Los Angeles, the Port of Los Angeles, and the State of California. The lighthouse was opened to the public on November 1, 2003 under the management of the Department of Recreation and Parks for the City of Los Angeles. Volunteers from the Point Fermin Lighthouse Society serve as tour guides and help to keep the lighthouse open to the public.

Photo courtesy of the City of Los Angeles.

Palos Verdes Interpretive Center

Palos Verdes Interpretive Center

Point Vicente Interpretive Center

Palos Verdes’ Point Vicente Interpretive Center was built by the City of Rancho Palos Verdes in 1984 at the cost of $1.3 million. The property consists of almost 10,000 square foot which features exhibits on the natural and cultural history of the Peninsula, with a special emphasis on the Pacific gray whale. This is the premier whale watching site of the coastal area which has volunteers who watch daily to record annual migration of the Pacific gray whale, from December through April.

On the tip of the point near the Interpretive Center you will see the Point Vicente Lighthouse which was built in 1926 and stands on a cliff 130 feet high, and is itself 67 feet high. The other buildings on the site provided housing for Coast Guard officers who worked in other areas. During the World Wars the hillside was the location of coastal artillery which was part of the harbor defenses of Los Angeles.

Today besides being able to visit the gift shop & museum, the property has become known as a party venue. Whether it’s for a birthday celebration, wedding celebration or just a viewing party, the facility has something for everyone. Just take a stroll throughout the property to view the native plantings and coastal walkways or sit in the amphitheater and just enjoy the view.

The Point Vicente Interpretive Center is located at 31501 Palos Verdes Drive South, Rancho Palos Verdes 90275 and is open daily from 10:00 to 5:00 p.m. (closed January 1, Thanksgiving Day, December 24 and 25).

Photo courtesy of the Point Vicente Interpretive Center.

Palos Verdes’ Point Fermin Park

Palos Verdes’ Point Fermin Park

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Palos Verdes Peninsula’s Point Fermin Park is a beautiful park sitting along the edge of the palisade and consists of 37 acres of landscaped lawns, pergolas, and colorful gardens. When at the top point of the park, you will get breaktaking views of the coast of the Santa Catalina Island, and enjoy watching seals, dolphins and an occasional whale pass by. This is a great location where you can enjoy the picnic areas, barbecue pits, children’s playground and small amphitheater which is the home to “Shakespeare in the Park” and numerous music venues.

The park was given it’s name by the British explorer George Vancouver who had visited the property in 1793 and wanted to thank Father Fermin Francisco de Lasuen for his hospitality at the mission in Carmel.

This is one of the few places along the coast where Monarch butterflies spend their winters.You can walk through the gardens and enjoy numerous plants and trees which make this a leisurely stroll worth visiting.

The park is located at 807 Paseo del Mar, San Pedro, Ca. 90731, and is open daily. For more information about the park call (310) 548-7705.

Photo courtesy of the City of Los Angeles Parks & Recreation.

Palos Verdes South Coast Botanic Garden

Palos Verdes South Coast Botanic Garden

South coast - about pvPalos Verdes South Coast Botanic Garden is one of the world’s first botanical garden developed over a sanitary landfill.

Amazingly at one time the Garden was covered by the Pacific Ocean. In the ocean there were a vast population of single cell algae called a diatoms. As they died they left behind a sediment know as crude distomite which has industrial uses for filtration as a stregthening component in building materials. During the early 1900′s the Dicalite Company began mining the earth and in 1944 the mine was sold.  By 1956 the mine declined and the site was sold to the County of Los Angeles to become a sanitary landfill.

In 1961 a group of private citizens headed by Frances Young prevailed upon the County Board of Supervisorys to convert this site into a botanic garden. It was an experiment and in April 1961 the first major planting took place with over 40,000 donated trees, shrubs and other plans. Since then the collection has increased to more than 200,000 plantings.

It has come a log way, and today bursting with color and varied plant and wildlife the grounds are spectacular. There are at least 14 Clubs and Societies which are informed about specific plant varieties and have at least twelve flower shows annually. They have monthly lectures, classes, concerts and weddings that help fill the calendar seven days a week.

The gardens are open 364 days a year from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cost to preview is adults $9/seniors $6/Students $6/Children 5-12 $4/ and four and under are free.

The South Coast Botanic Garden is located at 26300 Crenshaw Blvd, Palos Verdes Peninsula, Ca. 90274. For more information go to http://southcoastbotanicgarden.org or call (310) 544-1948.

Photo by Jeannie Mutrais courtesy of the South Coast Botanic Garden.

 

 

Korean Friendship Bell Welcomes Visitors

Korean Friendship Bell Welcomes Visitors

Korean Bell of Friendship and Bell Pavilion

The Korean Friendship Bell sits on the San Pedro side of the Palos Verdes Peninsula and is sometimes called the “Bell of Friendship”. The bell was donated as a Bicentennial gift in 1976 to the people of Los Angeles by the Republic of Korea to celebrate the bicentennial of the U.S. independence, honor veterans of the Korean War, and to recognize the friendship between the two countries. Over forty years ago then mayor, Tom Bradley dedicated the Korean Friendship Bell. 
The Friendship Bell weighs 17 tons and is twelve feel high and 7.5 feet wide.  The bell is made of copper and tin, with gold, nickel, lead and phosphorous for tone quality. On the sides of the bell the Statue of Liberty is paired four times with a Korean spirit.  Each Korean spirit holds up a different symbol – a design of the Korean flag, a branch of the rose of Sharon, (Korea’s national flower), a branch of Laurel (symbol of victory), and a dove of peace.  The bell does not have a clapper and must be struck with a wooden log.
The Korean Friendship Bell has attracted hundreds of visitors with its massive size and pagoda like stone structure.

The Korean Bell of Friendship and Bell Pavilion is located at the Angels Gate Park – 3601 S. Gaffey Street, San Pedro.  For more information call (310) 548-7705.

Photo courtesy of the City of Los Angeles.

Terranea Resort’s – Nelson’s

Terranea Resort’s – Nelson’s

Terranea Resort is considered one of the top tourist destinations in Southern California. As part of this great tourist destination, Nelson’s has been recognized as one of the top ten eco-friendly bars, and is the place to enjoy fresh California comfort cuisine, delicious microbrews and spectacular sunsets. Whether your looking for a view of the Point Vicente Lighthouse or Catalina Island, this Southern California find offers one of the most scenic locations in Palos Verdes to enjoy a meal or drink in a casual setting. Here you can watch the sunset by the patio fire pits, or relax inside and catch a sports event at the bar.

During the summer months you can even enjoy live music all the way up to Labor Day from Friday till Sunday’s. As an addition to the summer music series at Nelson’s, they will be having “Taimane”, the ukulele sensation from Hawaii, performing on August 26, 2017, at 7:00 p.m. at the Bluffs at Nelson’s. Taimane’s musical talent will amaze you along with her playing style and the energy she exudes from her performance.

Photo courtesy of Terranea Resort.

 

Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy

Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy

Wild Rye

Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy has been in existence since its founding in 1988, for the purpose of preserving undeveloped land as open space for historical, educational, ecological, recreational and scenic purposes. The Conservancy has been successful preserving the 1,600 acres of open space on the Palos Verdes Peninsula with the help of many volunteers..

The Conservancy’s vision is the creation and management of large blocks of natural open space where visitors may enjoy peaceful solitude, where children and adults can learn about the natural environment, and where native plants and animals can thrive.

The Conservancy hosts a full calendar of popular activities monthly with volunteer workdays, training programs for wildlife and trail repair, and special events throughout the year, including:

  • Nature walks, bird walks, and night hikes on the preserves
  • Special topic events and workshops
  • Volunteer workdays on the trails and at the nursery
  • Trail crew training for outdoor volunteers
  • Environmental education programs at White Point Nature Education Center
  • Family activities at George F Canyon Nature Center

To learn more about the Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy go to www.pvplc.org.

Photo courtesy of the Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy.

 

Palos Verdes Nature Preserves

Palos Verdes Nature Preserves

WPNP_education_center

The Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy has preserved more than 1,600 acres of open spaces on the Peninsula since its founding in 1988. Going back to the original plan by the Olmsted Brothers to make sure that 28% of the Peninsula would remain open space, the spectacular views and precious habitat not only contribute to the quality of human life on the peninsula, but provide valuable refuges and wildlife corridors for animal and plant inhabitants.

The diverse topography of the Peninsula with its beaches and bluffs, steep slopes, canyons and ridgelines leads to its rich biodiversity. Native coastal sage scrub, grassland, cactus and riparian scrub grow alongside non-native annual grassland, exotic woodlands and large areas of disturbed vegetation. The Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy helps to shelter four at risk species: the El Segundo blue butterfly, the Palos Verdes blue butterfly, the Coastal California gnatcatcher and the cactus wren. They cultivate 60 different species of plants that are used in restoration projects that restore habitat critical to survival of these species at their native plant nurseries.

The Palos Verdes Nature Preserve takes in almost 1,400 acres with over 30 miles of trails through rolling hills, steep canyons and rock outcrops.The PVNP is made up of the following Reserves:

To see a map of the Palos Verdes Nature Preserves click here.

Photo courtesy of the White Point Nature Education Center and Preserve.