Palos Verdes Nature Preserves

Palos Verdes Nature Preserves

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The Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy has preserved more than 1,600 acres of open spaces on the Peninsula since its founding in 1988. Going back to the original plan by the Olmsted Brothers to make sure that 28% of the Peninsula would remain open space, the spectacular views and precious habitat not only contribute to the quality of human life on the peninsula, but provide valuable refuges and wildlife corridors for animal and plant inhabitants.

The diverse topography of the Peninsula with its beaches and bluffs, steep slopes, canyons and ridgelines leads to its rich biodiversity. Native coastal sage scrub, grassland, cactus and riparian scrub grow alongside non-native annual grassland, exotic woodlands and large areas of disturbed vegetation. The Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy helps to shelter four at risk species: the El Segundo blue butterfly, the Palos Verdes blue butterfly, the Coastal California gnatcatcher and the cactus wren. They cultivate 60 different species of plants that are used in restoration projects that restore habitat critical to survival of these species at their native plant nurseries.

The Palos Verdes Nature Preserve takes in almost 1,400 acres with over 30 miles of trails through rolling hills, steep canyons and rock outcrops.The PVNP is made up of the following Reserves:

To see a map of the Palos Verdes Nature Preserves click here.

Photo courtesy of the White Point Nature Education Center and Preserve.

 

 

Palos Verdes – Point Vicente Lighthouse

Palos Verdes – Point Vicente Lighthouse

Point Vicente Lighthouse

Palos Verdes residents are lucky to have this beautiful gem here on the Peninsula. Located in the city of Rancho Palos Verdes the Point Vicente Lighthouse is an area jewel that was added as a historic site on the National Registry in 1979. This beautiful structure stands 67 feet tall, built on plastered reinforced concrete, and is similar to the one standing on Anacapa Island in the Channel Islands chain.

The Lighthouse stands on the southwesterly point of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. It was originally named in 1790 by Captain George Vancouver, after his good friend Friar Vicente of the Mission Buenaventura. After many ships and seamen lost their lives on these shores, in 1926 the U.S. Lighthouse Service began operation of the brightest beacon in Southern California here, and could be seen for over twenty miles. The U.S. Coast Guard took over operations of the lighthouse in 1939 and manned it until automated equipment and remote control operators took over in 1971.

These days the light still send out it’s beacon across the Catalina Channel. Electronic sensors and automated controls have replaced the lighthouse keeper and activate the fog horn. The housing facility is home to regular Coast Guard personnel assigned to nearby ships, stations and offices. The former radio center is now manned by volunteer civilian members of the Coast Guard Auxiliary who are responsible for the lighthouse besides taking distress calls from boaters in the Catalina Channel.

The Point Vicente Lighthouse is located at 31550 Palos Verdes Drive West, in Rancho Palos Verdes.

Photo courtesy of the City of Rancho Palos Verdes.

 

Palos Verdes Peninsula’s – Rolling Hills Estates

Palos Verdes Peninsula’s – Rolling Hills Estates

city of rolling hills estates

The Palos Verdes Peninsula consists of four cities, Palos Verdes Estates, Rolling Hills Estates, Rancho Palos Verdes & Rolling Hills.

The City of Rolling Hills Estates was incorporated on September 18, 1957. At that time the population was only 3,500, and the city had concerns over maintaining its rural atmosphere and equestrian lifestyle with bridle trails and vast open spaces. In 1959, the Montecillo, Chandler Quarry, Country Club Estates and northern Masongate areas were added to the city. Later between 1960-1966 they added the Peninsula Center, Harbor Sight, The Rancho, Rolling Hills Park Estates, Highridge, Hillcrest Manor & Meadows, Terraces and Cresta Verdes.

As we see these areas today, the 30 different neighborhoods make up their own Homeowner Associations to keep the community lifestyle to reflect each area.

It is considered to be the third largest city on the Palos Verdes Peninsula. It consists of 4.18 miles and there are quite a few of the lots that have 1/2 acre or more, and some areas are zoned equestrian. The city recognizes six parks, at least 25 acres of scenic trails and acres of open space. This area is often called the Heart of the Peninsula since it has the largest shopping and entertainment areas that contain the Peninsula Center, Promenade on the Peninsula and the Norris Theatre.

To read my last article on Palos Verdes Peninsula’s four cities click here.

Photo courtesy of the City of Rolling Hills Estates. 

 

 

 

Aboutpv – Palos Verdes Surf Spots

Aboutpv – Palos Verdes Surf Spots

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Palos Verdes has a very unique coastline which makes for some of the best surfing spots in the area. Some of the local surf spots in the area are: Avalanche, Indicator, Charlie’s, Cove, Dominator, Indicator, Boneyard, Exile’s, Haggarty’s, Lower’s, Middle’s, Pinnacle, Rat Beach, Rat Point, Pipe’s and many more.

Ski Jump and Boneyard are located at Bluff Cove which is said to be the first regularly surfed area followed by Haggarty’s and Lunada Bay. 

Surfing is big in Palos Verdes; with both our high schools having surf teams and several world class surfers have came from this area. Besides surfing in these coves, you will also find great areas with tide pools which can be accessed through these trails.

The area also is known for it’s clean waters.  Heal the Bay charts have come out every year for the past three years with A+ to A- clean water levels.  These are some of the highest and most consistent water level grades in the area.