Why choose me for all of your REAL ESTATE needs!!!

15 Reasons I’m the Rancho Palos Verdes, Palos Verdes Estates, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Manhattan Beach, and Hermosa Beach Real Estate Agent for You!

 
  • I have a total commitment to providing excellent service throughout the real estate transaction.
  • I have exceptional knowledge of the local Rancho Palos Verdes, Palos Verdes Estates, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach and surrounding Los Angeles County, CA areas real estate market.
  • As a real estate professional, I will be committed to negotiating on your behalf to help meet your specific goals and objectives.
  • I will engage in a comprehensive networking strategy to assist in the purchase or sale of your home.
  • I will go the extra mile for you to make sure your next real estate transaction is a smooth one.
  • I take pride in providing personalized service which means that I will be highly involved in the actual purchase or sale or your home.
  • I will utilize technology to better meet your specific real estate needs, whether you are buying or selling.
  • I will take on the difficult tasks to make moving an easy process.
  • I will assist you in finding the related services that are necessary to buy or sell a home or other property.
  • I will keep you apprised of current local real estate market conditions that can impact the purchase or sale of your home.
  • I engage in a corporate level of marketing to make sure that your home gets as much exposure as possible if you are a seller and that you find the perfect home if you are a buyer.
  • I work as a full time real estate professional which means you will have the pinnacle of support throughout your real estate transaction.
  • I will utilize my experience both in and out of real estate to let you attend to your family while I do the work making sure your real estate transaction is processed in the most trouble free manner possible.
  • I will respect your time and work with you so your busy schedule is not interrupted.
  • I will uphold the highest moral and ethical standards throughout any real estate transaction I am involved in.
 

The Hermosa Beach real estate and homes for sale request form covering the areas of Rancho Palos Verdes, Palos Verdes Estates, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach and all other Los Angeles, CA areas.

 

Do you need professional real estate representation in order to find a home in Rancho Palos Verdes, Palos Verdes Estates, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach or in another CA area? Are you thinking about selling your home in Rancho Palos Verdes, Palos Verdes Estates, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Manhattan Beach, or Hermosa Beach? If so, I can help meet all of your real estate needs. Whether you have residential real estate needs, commercial real estate needs, leasing needs, or income property needs, please fill out the following brief real estate quick request form describing how I can be of service. This form will help me provide you with outstanding real estate service. Thanks again.

If you do end up choosing me for any or all of your real etate needs feel free to contact me at (310)686-4688 or email me Tuba@remaxpv.com. Also dont forget visit my business and facbook page which are both linked above in my main menu!!! 

5 Errors Home Shoppers Should Avoid!!!

Real estate professionals say they keep seeing buyers make the same mistakes over and over again in a home purchase. Among some of the common errors they see:

  • Unrealistic time tables: With a regular sale, “assuming you’re preapproved and it’s straightforward, you can probably do it in 30 days, but 45 is more common,” says Ron Phipps, immediate past president of the National Association of REALTORS®. But he advises home buyers to prepare for 45 to 60 days. And if it’s a foreclosure property, they may encounter lien and title issues that could cause delays stretching that to 60 to 75 days, even up to 90 days. And for short sales, that timeframe will greatly depend on whether the lenders have already agreed to it and a preset price, but it could take anywhere from 45 days to even up to nine months, Phipps says.

 

  • Ignorance with financing: Home buyers should learn more about the mortgage process, learn the terminology, and know what questions to ask in shopping around for the best mortgage rate. For example, Carolyn Warren, author of “Homebuyers Beware,” cautions buyers to never tell a lender, “This is my first time, and I don’t know how it all works — and I need you to guide me through the process,” she says. “It’s like putting a sign on your forehead that says, ‘Charge me more.’”

 

  •  “Trash talking” when negotiating: If the home is painted pink and the buyer insists it needs to be repainted, he could risk jeopardizing negotiations. Instead, Phipps suggests that when making an offer, buyers should stress what they like about the home. “Don’t make it adversarial,” he says. A price reduction should be talked about in terms of what the home is worth to that buyer, he says.

 

  • Getting in over their heads: Buyers may be tempted to stretch their budget in order to get the house of their dreams. Phipps suggests buyers don’t stretch themselves so thin that they miss out on having a reserve fund in case they need to make any unexpected repairs once they move in. “In most homeownership situations, there are going to be some unforeseen circumstances,” Phipps says. “So you want to make sure you have some funds behind you.”

 

  • No Reserve Fund:  After finally finding that “dream home,” what buyer isn’t tempted to stretch as far as possible — and drain all available savings — just to make the numbers work? It’s one of the big homebuyer mistakes, Phipps says.Often, buyers fall in love with a property, and they try to rationalize the decision, he says. “You need to be disciplined about it.”Too often, buyers set a price range and then fall in love with something that costs more. So they figure they’ll borrow the difference, Phipps says.But you need a reserve fund — something you hold back to address unexpected problems, like the refrigerator that quits in mid-July, or the “like-new” water heater that dies the day after you move in. Or the realization — after seeing the neighbors sunbathing once too often — that you need a privacy fence, pronto.”In most homeownership situations, there are going to be some unforeseen circumstances,” Phipps says. “So you want to make sure you have some funds behind you.”

Article from http://realestate.glozal.com/profiles/blogs/5-errors-home-shoppers-should-avoid

If you do end up choosing me for any or all of your real etate needs feel free to contact me at (310)686-4688 or email me Tuba@remaxpv.com. Also dont forget visit my business and facbook page which are both linked above in my main menu!!! 

Movers Hold Home Owners’ Items Hostage?

It has been said that, next to divorce and the death of a family member, moving is among the most stressful experiences many people will have in their lifetime. Dealing with a bad moving company makes matters worse.

Federal lawmakers are cracking down on moving companies who try to hold home owners’ belongings hostage during a move — a scam that’s more common than many realize. Home owners will soon have more protection against this increasingly reported rip-off in the moving industry.

It usually involves a moving company providing a home owner with a lowball quote for a move. The mover then packs up the home owner’s belongings onto a truck and refuses to unload it until a higher fee is paid. Some unscrupulous moving companies are notorious for underestimating the weight of items they’ve been hired to transport and even resorting to extreme measures to squeeze a few extra dollars out of their customers — including holding everything a customer owns and cherishes essentially for ransom.

“Aside from being extorted for money, they may even damage your goods,” said Ada Vassilovski, vice president of online marketing and product management for Imagitas in Waltham, Mass., which operates MyMove.com, a resource offering advice for stress-free moves. “If you hire a mover to transport your goods across state lines and they hold your personal property hostage, you can appeal to the Department of Transportation and it now has the power to enforce fines,” she told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

President Barack Obama signed a law last month that will benefit people who think they have been scammed by a moving company. Beginning in October, movers who hold home owners’ items hostage can be fined by up to $10,000 a day, according to new rules imposed by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, an agency of the Department of Transportation. Starting in October 2014, new moving company owners will be mandated to pass tests on consumer protection and moving-cost estimates, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports. 

“We are finally seeing recognition that movers holding people’s possessions hostage is a problem,” Vassilovski says. “I don’t think many people are aware of this being a problem, so it’s great this legislation is shining a light on it.”

The Better Business Bureau reports that among the 4,790 industries it monitors, moving companies are No. 10 on the list of those receiving the most consumer complaints. In 2011, the bureau received 1.2 million inquires and complaints against movers. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, on the other hand, received 2,851 complaints that year. The federal agency only counts interstate moves, whereas the BBB data includes both interstate and intrastate moves. Movers used to be regulated by the Interstate Commerce Commission, but in an effort to balance the federal budget, Congress eliminated that agency in 1995.

“This legislation will educate people that there is a problem,” Ms. Vassilovski said. “But if you are moving you need to do your homework to select a mover that is reputable and not chose one based on price alone.”

Article from http://realestate.glozal.com/profiles/blogs/movers-hold-home-owners-items-hostage?xg_source=msg_mes_network

Scammers Targeting Delinquent Borrowers

Scammers have targeted delinquent borrowers during the past few years, hoping to take advantage of their desperation and financial inexperience. Their approach typically involves posing as a representative of a nonprofit or government agency who can help with a loan modification or some other form of assistance.

Sheri Stuart, education manager at Springboard Nonprofit Consumer Counseling, says she frequently encounters consumers at courses offered by her organization who have been victimized by these scams. Stuart says she recently met a couple from Southern California at one of these events who’d paid $3,000 to a fraudulent company in an attempt to keep their home out of foreclosure.

“It’s disconcerting,” she says. “It has a ripple effect. It not only affects the home owners, it affects the communities as well.”

To keep more consumers from being taken in by these scams, Stuart offers the following four red flags to help determine whether borrowers’ knight in shining armor is actually a swindler on the make:

1. They ask for money up front. “That’s usually an indication that someone has an ulterior motive,” Stuart says.

2. “Phantom help” appears out of nowhere. If a consumer hasn’t proactively contacted anyone about missed mortgage payments, but suddenly gets calls and mail about getting help for missed mortgage payments, it’s probably a scammer.

3. They present phony credentials. Many companies that claim to offer assistance will have official-looking seals from credentialing institutions on paperwork, promotional materials, and Web sites. Research those organizations to make sure they actually exist.

4. They make promises they can’t deliver. If they make ambitious guarantees about being able to modify loans or halt foreclosures, that should set off alarm bells. “Nobody can promise you a loan mod,” Stuart says.

Article from http://realestate.glozal.com/profiles/blogs/4-ways-to-id-borrower?xg_source=msg_mes_network
Picture curtosey of http://realestatescamsmichigan.blogspot.com/

Online Google Scams

The federal government has shut down dozens of Internet scam artists who had been paying Google to run ads making bogus promises to help desperate homeowners scrambling to avoid foreclosures.

The crackdown announced Wednesday renews questions about the role that Google’s massive advertising network plays in enabling online misconduct. It may also increase the pressure on the company to be more vigilant about screening the marketing pitches that appear alongside its Internet search results and other web content.

The criminal investigation into alleged mortgage swindlers comes three months after Google agreed to pay $500 million to avoid prosecution in Rhode Island for profiting from online ads from Canadian pharmacies that illegally sold drugs in the U.S.

A spokesman for the U.S. Treasury Department division overseeing the probe into online mortgage scams declined to comment on its scope other to say it’s still ongoing.

To read the full article please visit http://realestate.glozal.com/profiles/blogs/government-closes-mortgage-scams

Picture curtosey of http://onlinemakemoneyscams.com/make-money-online-scam/

Bank Suit Scams

“California prosecutors sued several lawyers and call center operators for allegedly duping desperate homeowners across the country into paying thousands of dollars to join dubious lawsuits against big banks.

The complaint unsealed Thursday in Los Angeles County Superior Court accuses prominent foreclosure attorneys Philip Kramer and Mitchell Stein and at least 17 other individuals and businesses of ensnaring borrowers in a scheme that falsely promised a cut of future settlements.

The lawsuit portrays the defendants as the most recent in the chain of mortgage-related scammers who helped fuel the housing bubble and have cashed in on its collapse. The defendants previously worked in the fraud-ridden loan modification industry, in which lawyers offer to negotiate better mortgage terms on behalf of troubled borrowers in exchange for a fee.”

They are accused of telling borrowers that they had a solid claim to being victims of predatory lending because courts had already found most lenders to have approved inappropriate mortgages.”

This is a article from Glozal.com

To read the rest of the article please visit http://realestate.glozal.com/profiles/blogs/lawyers-accused-of-scam?xg_source=msg_mes_network