5 Errors Home Shoppers Should Avoid!!!

Real estate professionals say they keep seeing buyers make the same mistakes over and over again in a home purchase. Among some of the common errors they see:

  • Unrealistic time tables: With a regular sale, “assuming you’re preapproved and it’s straightforward, you can probably do it in 30 days, but 45 is more common,” says Ron Phipps, immediate past president of the National Association of REALTORS®. But he advises home buyers to prepare for 45 to 60 days. And if it’s a foreclosure property, they may encounter lien and title issues that could cause delays stretching that to 60 to 75 days, even up to 90 days. And for short sales, that timeframe will greatly depend on whether the lenders have already agreed to it and a preset price, but it could take anywhere from 45 days to even up to nine months, Phipps says.

 

  • Ignorance with financing: Home buyers should learn more about the mortgage process, learn the terminology, and know what questions to ask in shopping around for the best mortgage rate. For example, Carolyn Warren, author of “Homebuyers Beware,” cautions buyers to never tell a lender, “This is my first time, and I don’t know how it all works — and I need you to guide me through the process,” she says. “It’s like putting a sign on your forehead that says, ‘Charge me more.’”

 

  •  “Trash talking” when negotiating: If the home is painted pink and the buyer insists it needs to be repainted, he could risk jeopardizing negotiations. Instead, Phipps suggests that when making an offer, buyers should stress what they like about the home. “Don’t make it adversarial,” he says. A price reduction should be talked about in terms of what the home is worth to that buyer, he says.

 

  • Getting in over their heads: Buyers may be tempted to stretch their budget in order to get the house of their dreams. Phipps suggests buyers don’t stretch themselves so thin that they miss out on having a reserve fund in case they need to make any unexpected repairs once they move in. “In most homeownership situations, there are going to be some unforeseen circumstances,” Phipps says. “So you want to make sure you have some funds behind you.”

 

  • No Reserve Fund:  After finally finding that “dream home,” what buyer isn’t tempted to stretch as far as possible — and drain all available savings — just to make the numbers work? It’s one of the big homebuyer mistakes, Phipps says.Often, buyers fall in love with a property, and they try to rationalize the decision, he says. “You need to be disciplined about it.”Too often, buyers set a price range and then fall in love with something that costs more. So they figure they’ll borrow the difference, Phipps says.But you need a reserve fund — something you hold back to address unexpected problems, like the refrigerator that quits in mid-July, or the “like-new” water heater that dies the day after you move in. Or the realization — after seeing the neighbors sunbathing once too often — that you need a privacy fence, pronto.”In most homeownership situations, there are going to be some unforeseen circumstances,” Phipps says. “So you want to make sure you have some funds behind you.”

Article from http://realestate.glozal.com/profiles/blogs/5-errors-home-shoppers-should-avoid

If you do end up choosing me for any or all of your real etate needs feel free to contact me at (310)686-4688 or email me Tuba@remaxpv.com. Also dont forget visit my business and facbook page which are both linked above in my main menu!!! 

Hello blog readers!!!

Hello fellow bloggers and blog readers,

I just want to take this time to tell you a little bit about my self, my name is Tuba and I am a Real Estate Consultant with RE/MAX Palos Verdes Realty. I have been an agent for over 25 years, I am also a member of the exclusive RE/MAX Hall of Fame, as well as the prestigious Platinum Club. I rank in the top 1% of agents in the business and my sales record will prove it. So if you are looking for a realtor you have found the right one. I am here to service all of your real estate needs so feel free to comment on this blog post if you are looking to buy or sell a home. :)

Enjoy this amazing pasta salad recipe and dont forget my service is almost as good as this salad!!!

1 12 tbsps white sugar
1 tsp salt (taste)
1 12 tsps black pepper (ground)
1 tsp onion powder
1 12 tsps dijon mustard
2 cloves chopped garlic
1 12 cups fresh basil (chopped)
12 cup fresh oregano (chopped)
14 cup fresh cilantro (chopped)
2 tsps hot pepper sauce (g tabasco)
13 cup red wine vinegar
12 cup olive oil
1 tsp lemon juice
4 ozs grated parmesan cheese
4 plum tomatoes (roma, chopped)
6 green onions (chopped)
4 ozs black olives (minced)
16 ozs bow tie pasta (farfalle)
12 cup pine nuts
1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

Directions: 1. In a large bowl, whisk together the sugar, salt, pepper, onion powder, mustard, garlic, basil, oregano, cilantro, hot pepper sauce, red wine vinegar, olive oil, lemon juice, and Parmesan cheese. Add the tomatoes, green onions and olives to the bowl, and stir to coat. Refrigerate.

2. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add the pasta, and cook for 7 minutes, or until tender. Drain, and rinse with cold water to cool. Add pasta to the bowl of dressing, and mix well. Top with mozzarella cheese and pine nuts. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour before serving.

The 10 ‘Emptiest’ Housing Markets

Empty homes still plague a lot of cities across the country. In fact, since 2000, vacant properties have risen by about 43 percent nationwide, according to Census Bureau data. (Homes are defined as vacant by “unoccupied rental inventory” or homes unoccupied that are for-sale.) 

Vacant properties can affect home values nearby. For example, a study earlier this year found that a vacant home has the potential to decrease the value of nearby homes by at least 1.3 percent, according to the Cleveland Federal Reserve. In higher income neighborhoods, the impact can be even more drastic—possibly lowering nearby home prices by 4.6 percent. In low poverty areas, each additional vacant or tax delinquent home was found to reduce values of surrounding properties by between 1.7 percent and 1.8 percent.

The following are the six cities with the largest home owner and rental vacancies based on the last 12 months: 

 

1. Orlando, Fla.
Home owner vacancy rate: 2.2%
Rental vacancy rate: 18.8% 

The emptiest city in the United States is Orlando, Fla. The 12-month average for rental vacancies stands at a staggering 18.8 percent, while in the first quarter of 2012 this number was 22 percent, highest in the nation. Florida’s third largest city also has an above-average homeowner vacancy rate, but this metric has been rising during the past two quarters, according to Census Bureau data. Despite its housing woes, Orlando has been able to avoid the financial woes of other cities, such as Harrisburg, Pa., and San Bernardino and Stockton, California.

 

2. Dayton, Ohio
Home owner vacancy rate: 5.4%
Rental vacancy rate: 11.3%

The good news is that Dayton’s homeowner vacancy rate has been trending downward since its peak in the third quarter of 2011, when it stood at 6.5 percent. However, even this improving number gives Dayton the distinction of having the highest average homeowner vacancy rate in the country, according to the Census Data. And Dayton’s average rental vacancy rate, at 11.3 percent, is higher than the 75 city average of 9.2 percent. The Census Bureau calculations put Dayton’s gross vacancy rate at 16.9 percent, more than 6 percent above the large city average, and the highest in the country.

 

3. Memphis, Tenn.
Home owner vacancy rate: 3.1%
Rental vacancy rate: 15%

Memphis’s proportion of vacant homes, both owned and rentals, puts it third overall, thanks to an average rental vacancy rate of 15 percent that is the fifth highest in the nation and the 3.1 percent homeowner vacancy rate that ranks 13th.

 

4. Detroit
Home owner vacancy rate: 1.7%
Rental vacancy rate: 16.9%

Detroit was one of the hardest hit cities in the recession, and with an unemployment rate of 9.9 percent as of May, it’s little wonder that its 16.9 percent rental vacancy rate is the second highest in the country. Surprisingly, though, the homeowner vacancy rate remains below the 75 largest metro area’s average of 2.18 percent. According to the Census Bureau, at the end of 2011, Detroit had a gross vacancy rate of 12.2 percent, a level the city has virtually maintained since 2006.

 

5. Richmond, Va.
Home owner vacancy rate: 2.4%
Rental vacancy rate: 15.1%

With a rental vacancy rate of 15.1 percent, Virginia’s capital ranks fourth among all major U.S. cities for empty rentals over the past year, with the first quarter of 2012 showing a 19 percent rental vacancy rate. However, Richmond’s homeowner vacancy rate ranks only 27th among the country’s 75 largest metro areas, and stands just 0.2 percent higher than the average for large metro areas.

 

6. Las Vegas
Home owner vacancy rate: 3.9%
Rental vacancy rate: 11.9% 

Over the past five years, the Las Vegas housing market has experienced one of the country’s most dramatic boom-and-bust cycles. The city continues to feel the pain. At the end of 2011, Las Vegas ranked second in the country for gross vacancy rates, at 16 percent, and currently has an unemployment rate of 11.8 percent. In the past 12 months, Las Vegas’ rental vacancy rates have dropped from a high of 13.2 percent in the third quarter of 2011 to a low of 11 percent in the first quarter of 2012, the most recent number available. Although Las Vegas remains one of the most vacant U.S. cities, homeowner vacancies are a bright spot, dropping from 5.5 percent over the past year to 2.3 percent in the most recent quarter.

 

7. Atlanta
Homeowner vacancy rate: 4.2 percent
Rental vacancy rate: 11.3 percent

Atlanta’s average homeowner vacancy rate is the third-highest among major U.S. cities, standing at 4.2 percent. Fortunately for Atlanta, the rate has been dropping since early 2011, when it stood at 5.4 percent. The trend for rental vacancies has been worse for Atlanta, however, rising from 9.4 percent in the third quarter of 2011 to 12.4 percent in the first quarter of 2012.

 

8. Houston
Homeowner vacancy rate: 1.9 percent
Rental vacancy rate: 15.5 percent

Houston is home to the nation’s third-highest rental vacancy rate over the past 12 months, standing at 15.5 percent. The city hit a three-year high for rental vacancies in 2009, when the rate rose to 18.4 percent in the third quarter of that year, according to Census Bureau data. However, Houston’s homeowner vacancy rate has been recovering, dropping below the average for the 75 largest cities for the past three quarters to as low as 1.1 percent at the end of 2011.

 

9. Tampa, Fla.
Homeowner vacancy rate: 3.2 percent
Rental vacancy rate: 12.8 percent

It’s no secret that the Florida real estate market has seen better times — and the situation in Tampa appears to be getting worse. In May, RealtyTrac reported that foreclosure activity in the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater area rose by nearly 111 percent from May 2011, with one home in every 304 in foreclosure. The rental vacancy market has been following this downward trend, with the rental vacancy rate going up or remaining flat every quarter since the beginning of 2011.

 

10. Toledo, Ohio
Homeowner vacancy rate: 3.8 percent
Rental vacancy rate: 11.5 percent

Of the 75 largest U.S. cities in the first quarter of 2012, Toledo recorded the highest rate for homeowner vacancies, at 5.6 percent. However, in three of the past four quarters listed by the Census Bureau, that rate has hovered between 3 and 3.6 percent, significantly bringing down the city’s 12 month average, and its overall ranking in this list. Regardless, the 3.8 percent 12 month average still ranks Toledo as the fifth highest in the country for homeowner vacancies alone.

Article fromhttp://realestate.glozal.com/profiles/blogs/the-10-emptiest-housing-markets?xg_source=msg_mes_network

Celebrities Lose Their Star Power With Housing!!!

Celebrities are increasingly finding that having a famous name doesn’t always help them sell real estate, even though those famous names may help them move movie or music tickets, perfumes, or other products. 

Several celebrities who have tried to sell their homes recently have had to reduce their asking prices or have found their big-priced homes linger on the market waiting for a buyer. 

In the last year, for example, actors like Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell have had to reduce the asking price for their $11.2 million Malibu beach home by $3.5 million. Ozzy and Sharon Osbourne sold their Malibu home for 21 percent less than their original asking price at $7.9 million. Actress Meg Ryan has relisted her Bel Air mansion at $11.4 million, a 42 percent price reduction since she first listed it in 2008.  

“In the art world, there is this notion of provenance — that who owns something can detract or add to the value,” says Elizabeth Currid-Halkett, author of Starstruck: The Business of Celebrity. “But it does not seem to translate to celebrity homes.”

However, celebrities do tend to draw extra attention for their for-sale homes. But real estate pros say that celebrities just shouldn’t equate that with a “sold” sign or a boost in sales price.  

“The value of a house has more to do with the individual stamp the person puts on the property, real estate experts say, than a famous autograph on the sales contract,” according to a recent Los Angeles Times article.

Article from http://realestate.glozal.com/profiles/blogs/celebrities-lose-their-star-power-with-housing?xg_source=msg_mes_network

Pet Friendly Homes

Most homes are not designed with the family pet in mind, but Fauna Plus Design of Kobe, Japan, designs dog-friendly homes that are both attractive, practical, and attentive to animal behavior. To maximize space, the company has designed a home with an indoor kennel for a Labrador retriever located under a children’s playroom and another home with a waterproof indoor kennel, located under a study, for two dachshunds.

Pet-friendly design also might involve kennels made from cabinets featuring odor-absorbing materials, ventilation systems that remove hair, outdoor dog showers, and special backyard-accessible spaces for dogs. These concepts have not been embraced in the United States, apart from doggy doors and pet-resistant fabrics, despite the fact that Americans shelled out over $50 billion on their pets last year, according to the American Pet Products Association.

The Pet Realty Network, however, enables U.S. real estate agents to meet the needs of clients with pets, helping them to locate homes with elevators, mudrooms with dog washes, and other useful features. Still, experts say that it remains to be seen whether home design will evolve to fully embrace the family pet.

 

Article and picture curtosey of http://realestate.glozal.com/profiles/blogs/a-house-that-s-for-the-dogs?xg_source=msg_mes_network