Why choose me for all of your REAL ESTATE needs!!!

15 Reasons I’m the Rancho Palos Verdes, Palos Verdes Estates, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Manhattan Beach, and Hermosa Beach Real Estate Agent for You!

 
  • I have a total commitment to providing excellent service throughout the real estate transaction.
  • I have exceptional knowledge of the local Rancho Palos Verdes, Palos Verdes Estates, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach and surrounding Los Angeles County, CA areas real estate market.
  • As a real estate professional, I will be committed to negotiating on your behalf to help meet your specific goals and objectives.
  • I will engage in a comprehensive networking strategy to assist in the purchase or sale of your home.
  • I will go the extra mile for you to make sure your next real estate transaction is a smooth one.
  • I take pride in providing personalized service which means that I will be highly involved in the actual purchase or sale or your home.
  • I will utilize technology to better meet your specific real estate needs, whether you are buying or selling.
  • I will take on the difficult tasks to make moving an easy process.
  • I will assist you in finding the related services that are necessary to buy or sell a home or other property.
  • I will keep you apprised of current local real estate market conditions that can impact the purchase or sale of your home.
  • I engage in a corporate level of marketing to make sure that your home gets as much exposure as possible if you are a seller and that you find the perfect home if you are a buyer.
  • I work as a full time real estate professional which means you will have the pinnacle of support throughout your real estate transaction.
  • I will utilize my experience both in and out of real estate to let you attend to your family while I do the work making sure your real estate transaction is processed in the most trouble free manner possible.
  • I will respect your time and work with you so your busy schedule is not interrupted.
  • I will uphold the highest moral and ethical standards throughout any real estate transaction I am involved in.
 

The Hermosa Beach real estate and homes for sale request form covering the areas of Rancho Palos Verdes, Palos Verdes Estates, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach and all other Los Angeles, CA areas.

 

Do you need professional real estate representation in order to find a home in Rancho Palos Verdes, Palos Verdes Estates, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach or in another CA area? Are you thinking about selling your home in Rancho Palos Verdes, Palos Verdes Estates, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Manhattan Beach, or Hermosa Beach? If so, I can help meet all of your real estate needs. Whether you have residential real estate needs, commercial real estate needs, leasing needs, or income property needs, please fill out the following brief real estate quick request form describing how I can be of service. This form will help me provide you with outstanding real estate service. Thanks again.

If you do end up choosing me for any or all of your real etate needs feel free to contact me at (310)686-4688 or email me Tuba@remaxpv.com. Also dont forget visit my business and facbook page which are both linked above in my main menu!!! 

5 Errors Home Shoppers Should Avoid!!!

Real estate professionals say they keep seeing buyers make the same mistakes over and over again in a home purchase. Among some of the common errors they see:

  • Unrealistic time tables: With a regular sale, “assuming you’re preapproved and it’s straightforward, you can probably do it in 30 days, but 45 is more common,” says Ron Phipps, immediate past president of the National Association of REALTORS®. But he advises home buyers to prepare for 45 to 60 days. And if it’s a foreclosure property, they may encounter lien and title issues that could cause delays stretching that to 60 to 75 days, even up to 90 days. And for short sales, that timeframe will greatly depend on whether the lenders have already agreed to it and a preset price, but it could take anywhere from 45 days to even up to nine months, Phipps says.

 

  • Ignorance with financing: Home buyers should learn more about the mortgage process, learn the terminology, and know what questions to ask in shopping around for the best mortgage rate. For example, Carolyn Warren, author of “Homebuyers Beware,” cautions buyers to never tell a lender, “This is my first time, and I don’t know how it all works — and I need you to guide me through the process,” she says. “It’s like putting a sign on your forehead that says, ‘Charge me more.’”

 

  •  “Trash talking” when negotiating: If the home is painted pink and the buyer insists it needs to be repainted, he could risk jeopardizing negotiations. Instead, Phipps suggests that when making an offer, buyers should stress what they like about the home. “Don’t make it adversarial,” he says. A price reduction should be talked about in terms of what the home is worth to that buyer, he says.

 

  • Getting in over their heads: Buyers may be tempted to stretch their budget in order to get the house of their dreams. Phipps suggests buyers don’t stretch themselves so thin that they miss out on having a reserve fund in case they need to make any unexpected repairs once they move in. “In most homeownership situations, there are going to be some unforeseen circumstances,” Phipps says. “So you want to make sure you have some funds behind you.”

 

  • No Reserve Fund:  After finally finding that “dream home,” what buyer isn’t tempted to stretch as far as possible — and drain all available savings — just to make the numbers work? It’s one of the big homebuyer mistakes, Phipps says.Often, buyers fall in love with a property, and they try to rationalize the decision, he says. “You need to be disciplined about it.”Too often, buyers set a price range and then fall in love with something that costs more. So they figure they’ll borrow the difference, Phipps says.But you need a reserve fund — something you hold back to address unexpected problems, like the refrigerator that quits in mid-July, or the “like-new” water heater that dies the day after you move in. Or the realization — after seeing the neighbors sunbathing once too often — that you need a privacy fence, pronto.”In most homeownership situations, there are going to be some unforeseen circumstances,” Phipps says. “So you want to make sure you have some funds behind you.”

Article from http://realestate.glozal.com/profiles/blogs/5-errors-home-shoppers-should-avoid

If you do end up choosing me for any or all of your real etate needs feel free to contact me at (310)686-4688 or email me Tuba@remaxpv.com. Also dont forget visit my business and facbook page which are both linked above in my main menu!!! 

For renters, buying a home pays off after three years on average!!!

Home buying versus renting

Real estate website Zillow has a provocative data point for every renter thinking about buying these days: That move pays off after just three years on average nationwide.

The company, which lists for-sale and for-rent information on its site, has released a new analysis of what it calls the “break-even horizon,” comparing what it would cost to buy or rent the same home in a number of U.S. markets over time.

The rent-or-buy calculus varies widely depending on where you live.

In the combined Los Angeles and Orange counties, the magic number is 4.3 years, assuming the buyer has made a 20% down payment. Buying wins out after only 1.6 year in the desert community of Banning. But Newport Beach residents must wait 14 years for buying to make more financial sense than renting.

The analysis takes into account a host of factors potential buyers should think about when considering the leap, including the down payment, mortgage and rental payments, buying and selling costs, property taxes, utilities, maintenance costs and tax deductions. The analysis adjusts for inflation and forecasts home value and rental price appreciation.

Zillow senior economist Svenja Gudell said the data should help homeowners get a rough and immediate sense of whether buying makes sense in a particular area in relation to their financial situation.

“For a home buyer out there, it is really tough to get a good grip on the buy-versus-rent decision,” Gudell said. Although buying a home is a deeply personal decision, she said, the analysis gives consumers “a sense for ‘Am I ready to make this decision?’”

The new take on the classic rent-versus-buy debate comes at a tenuous moment for the housing market. Many analysts believe that a housing bottom has been reached but don’t expect a return to the heady days of the real estate bubble. There is already some concern about the strength of the recovery, with home sales slowing in June as inventory remained tight and buyers paid higher prices.

At the same time, rents are rising, housing affordability is at record levels, and mortgage interest rates remain very low. These factors are prompting many renters to consider homeownership.

Stuart Gabriel, director of UCLA’s Ziman Center for Real Estate, noted that the main lesson from the subprime mortgage debacle and the housing bust was that homeownership shouldn’t be pushed at all costs. Federal policy has been adjusted to support this new point of view.

“One of the things we have learned in recent years is, obviously, house prices don’t always go up, and even over the very long term in certain markets homeownership may only offer a minimal return,” Gabriel said.

“What we have all learned is to treat homeownership as a bit of a dangerous animal. You know it’s not always good, and it’s not good for everyone.”

Things to consider when buying, particularly in an slowly appreciating market, include how mobile will you be, your financial situation, marital status, career goals and personality, Gabriel said.

Richard Green, director of the USC Lusk Center for Real Estate, added that in many regions buying has become increasingly attractive compared with renting. There are also non-financial reasons for buying.

“I can enjoy living in this house for the rest of my life, and nobody can throw me out of it,” he said. “You are consuming something, and you have control over it, and control has some value.”

Zillow’s analysis, which covered more than 200 metropolitan areas and 7,500 U.S. cities, found that buying is a better financial decision than renting in the Riverside-San Bernardino area if you live in the home for at least two years. That rises to 3.2 years in the area including Oxnard, Thousand Oaks and Ventura.

The San Francisco metropolitan area’s break-even score of 5.9 years encompasses a range from two years to 24.3 years.

Cities With the Highest and Lowest Credit Scores

Cities With the Highest Average Credit Scores

  1. Wausau, Wis.: 789
  2. Minneapolis: 787
  3. Madison, Wis.: 785
  4. Cedar Rapids, Iowa: 781
  5. San Francisco: 781
  6. Green Bay, Wis.: 780
  7. Boston: 779
  8. Peoria, Ill.: 778
  9. Sioux Falls, S.D.: 778
  10. La Crosse, Wis.: 777

 Cities With the Lowest Average Credit Scores

  1. Harlingen, Texas: 686
  2. Jackson, Miss.: 701
  3. Corpus Christi, Texas: 702
  4. Monroe, La.: 706
  5. Shreveport, La.: 706
  6. Augusta, Ga.: 709
  7. Bakersfield, Calif.: 709
  8. Las Vegas, Nev.: 709
  9. Tyler, Texas: 710
  10. El Paso, Texas: 710

“ Overall, the national average for credit scores was 749, according to the study. The cities with the lowest credit scores tended to also have high foreclosure rates and high unemployment. On the other hand, cities with the highest average credit scores — which were mostly in the Midwest — tended to have a better employment picture.”

 

Picture courtesy of http://answers.yourdictionary.com/invest/what-good-credit-score.html

Article from Glozal.com

To read the complete article please visit http://realestate.glozal.com/profiles/blogs/cities-with-highest-lowest-credit-scores?xg_source=msg_mes_network